While work to sign a comprehensive and comprehensive free trade agreement between Ukraine and the EU began for the first time in 1999,[188] formal negotiations between the Ukrainian government and the EU Trade Commissioner did not begin until 18 February 2008. [189] In May 2011, three issues remain unresolved in the free trade agreement: Ukrainian grain export quotas, access to the EU services market and geographical names of Ukrainian raw materials. Beyond these issues, the agreement was ready. [190] Despite these outstanding issues, Ukraine was ready to sign the agreement at present. Although Ukraine wanted stronger wording of the eu`s enlargement prospects and market access for its truckers, Ukraine had more than many other candidates at the same stage of the process. The final agreement was signed on July 19, 2012. [191] The ratification of the DCFTA was blocked by the EU due to concerns about the rule of law in Ukraine. [42] [43] [44] These include the application of selective justice and the modification of the right to vote. As a result, the role of Ukrainian oligarchs in sanctioning the agreement has also been called into question. [192] The agreement comes after more than two decades in which the two sides have attempted to forge closer ties. On the one hand, the European Union wants to ensure that its imports of cereals and natural gas from Ukraine and its merchandise exports to Ukraine are not threatened by instability in the region, believing that instability could ultimately be reduced by socio-political and economic reforms in Ukraine.

[7] Ukraine, on the other hand, wants to increase its exports by taking advantage of free trade with the European Union, while attracting desirable external investment and strengthening ties with a socio-political unit with which many Ukrainians have a strong cultural link. Western Ukraine is generally more enthusiastic about joining the EU than eastern Ukraine. [9] [10] During trilateral discussions in early September 2014, the European Commission, the Ukrainian and Russian government agreed to postpone the provisional implementation of the agreement until the end of 2015. “We have agreed to postpone the request until 31 December next year,” EU Trade Commissioner Karel De Gucht said on 12 September 2014 in Brussels, at the end of talks with Russian Economy Minister Alexei Ulyukayev and Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin.